3 Moves to include every week

3 Moves to include every week

3 Moves to include every week

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The Squat

Unparalleled as far as leg strength development (an essential part of any sport), the full-depth squat — hip crease below the knee —finds its way into my weekly program in some form almost every time I’m in the gym.

Full-range squatting recruits all the muscles of the lower body and helps develop power through a large range of motion as well as flexibility, core strength and stability as the body moves through such a large range of motion.

Although I back squat only once a week and front squat heavy once or twice a week, I include movements that involve a squat in a lot of my daily conditioning workouts. Both the snatch and clean Olympic weightlifting movements are good examples. Wall balls, thrusters, overhead squats and pistol squats also involve squats.

 

The Strict Pull-Up

Contrary to what many people believe about CrossFit, I actually practice the strict pull-up significantly more than I do “kipping” or “butterfly” pull-ups. I believe there is no better movement for developing upper-body pulling strength, which carries over into an array of movements besides the pull-up.

The strict pull-up, when trained for volume (rather than doing weighted pull-ups), develops muscular strength and endurance in the biceps, forearms and upper back. This will help in any movement in which you need to pull your body or any weighted object, such as a muscle up, rope climb, kettlebell swing or even a power clean and/or snatch.

Also, when performed with correct technique and full range of motion (from a dead hang until the chin is clear of the bar and with the body in a tight, “hollow” position), the pull-up is a great core exercise.

 

Assault Bike

The assault bike is hands-down my favourite piece of equipment, and I use mine almost daily and for the majority of my basic cardio work.

The assault bike is painfully beautiful because the harder you push on it, the harder it is to pedal.

I prefer the assault bike to running because I find it easier to control my pacing and efforts using its inbuilt computer. I also can structure my conditioning around holding a certain wattage or RPM to suit my training goals that day.