Do you need a Personal Trainer?

Do you need a Personal Trainer?

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Do you need a Personal Trainer?

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The road to health and fitness can be long and arduous, but one definitely worth taking. The rewards you’ll reap are numerous, but even so, you’ll still want to make that rocky path to fitness as easy and smooth and possible.

Do you make your own way or enlist the help of a personal trainer? The truth is, there are myriad benefits to both trains of thought, so let’s take a look at both and see which one is best fit for you.

Personal Trainer

Positives

Gives clear direction: If you have no clear idea of where to start on your fitness journey, then you’re perhaps best off looking for a personal trainer. If you’re looking to draw up a comprehensive fitness regime, or have a firm idea in mind of what precisely you’d like to get out of exercising, a personal trainer is the person to turn to.

Shows you the way around the gym: Gym equipment can also seem confusing, especially if you’ve never laid eyes upon it before. What do all those ropes, pulleys and levers do? It’s questions like these that a personal trainer can answer, as well as being able to give you quality direction.

Offers targeted advice: Experienced personal trainers can personalise your exercises to help achieve goals tailored towards you. Additionally, they can provide advice on the correct form, how to avoid injury, and the rate at which to ramp up your workout intensity.

Motivates: Personal trainers are a great way to motivate reluctant gym-goers – if you feel like your resolve is beginning to slide and it’s becoming ever more difficult to lift yourself from the lounge, a personal trainer can step in to keep you on track.

Negatives

Cost: Hiring a personal trainer can be costly. The price will vary, but you can expect to spend between $25-$80 per hour.

Finding the right person: Sifting through a range of them to find the one that best matches your personality can be tough. When personality clashes occur, there may be a hindrance to progress, which could defeat the purpose of having a trainer at all!

On your own

Positives

Choose your own journey: If you’re pretty confident at the gym, there’s no real reason you have to go with a personal trainer. Going solo works well for people with a working knowledge of training and fitness.

Fit it into your schedule: Training by yourself can give you the flexibility you need to organise your workouts. If you don’t have time to commit to specified training sessions and need to fit in sessions when you can, being your own trainer is the perfect choice.

Save money: Doing your own training also means it can be a lot less costly.

Negatives

Frustration, lack of results: However, training by yourself can result in a lack of motivation and frustration if you don’t begin to see the results you want right away.

Less direction and motivation: Additionally, you can begin to lack direction and your training mistakes will either go unnoticed or become difficult to correct without the right guidance.

Either way, simply deciding that you want to get fitter is a huge step in the right direction, whether you choose a personal trainer or not. You could even have the best of both worlds and invest in a fitness tracker – you’ll be able to measure your progress with a little guidance, but mostly solo.