Training for the CrossFit Games

Training for the CrossFit Games

0

Training for the CrossFit Games

1.45K
0

With regionals in the rear view mirror, it’s time for me to shift my focus towards the 2016 Reebok CrossFit Games. Training for the CrossFit Games is probably quite different to what most people would imagine.

While many people believe CrossFit is all about hitting circuits in the gym using barbells and bodyweight movements, the Games have continued to evolve and test a broad range of movements and modalities. Training to compete has had to evolve as well.

The major change to my training is a significant increase in endurance work, particularly running and swimming.

In the weekly training guide outlined below, you’ll also see I’m allocating very little time to ‘traditional CrossFit’ (things such as the types of circuits for time or AMRAPs) to allow my lifting to stay consistent and avoid any joint issues with the increase in endurance work.

Endurance work mostly consists of either a longer monostructural effort such as a 5-10km run, or interval training such as 100, 200 or even 400-800m repeats. The reason for the increased endurance training sessions is that the Games almost always has several events of 30-120 minutes in length, while the regionals and open are generally all under 20 minutes long.

As well as the increased endurance events, the CrossFit Games tends to test a variety of feats of athleticism beyond what most CrossFitters would practice in their general training.

In previous years I’ve competed, we have had agility sprints, hurdles, military obstacle courses, standing broad jumps, a prone board paddle and pieces of equipment custom-built for the Games such as peg boards, weighted wheelbarrows, hammers and weighted blocks.

The variety of limitless possibilities means spending a lot more of my training devoted to odd object and random fitness activities, which is actually a lot of fun. Some of my favorites are rock climbing, kayaking and attending an adult gymnastics class.