Don’t think too much – here’s what should you eat for your personality type

Don’t think too much – here’s what should you eat for your personality type

Don’t think too much – here’s what should you eat for your personality type

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We’ve detailed a food plan for the Thinker, and now, it’s time to move on to another one of the five diet personality types that most people fall into.

In September last year, CSIRO launched a new online program, called CSIRO Diet Types, which helps you understand your personal diet type and tailor your habits to have a more balanced approach to your diet.

The behaviour characteristics associated with each personality, the Thinker, the Craver, the Foodie, the Socialiser and the Freewheeler, according to the research organisation, play an important role in your food intake and how you maintain a diet.

This week, we focus on the Craver.

CSIRO has described the craver as those defined by heightened experience of food cravings, which may predispose to overeating in a variety of food related settings.

Based on CSIRO’s research, which polled close to 100,000 Australians, Cravers (26 per cent of respondents) were the most likely to meet the Australian Dietary Guidelines for carbohydrate food intake and over consumed discretionary foods such as cakes and biscuits, savoury pies and pastries, chocolate and confectionary, processed meats and ice-cream, sugar sweetened beverages and alcohol.

Specifically, cravers had a preference for sweeter discretionary foods like chocolate and confectionary, accounting for 24 per cent of their total discretionary food intake. Other foods like alcohol, cakes and biscuits and savoury snacks each contributed more than 10 per cent of their total discretionary food intake.

In addition, CSIRO found that they consumed high amounts of processed meat and alternatives, as well as dairy and alternatives.

Over half of Cravers also had a Body Mass Index (BMI) that put them in the obese category.

So, if you are a Craver, this meal plan is designed to combat your cravings by filling you up with lots of fresh fruits and vegetables that contain natural sugars and a tonne of fibre. It is also full of low GI carbs like brown rice and sweet potato, to keep you fuller for longer, maintain your blood glucose levels and increase your mental performance.

 

Breakfast Lunch Dinner Snack (since cravers go for discretionary foods)
Mon Kale, celery, carrot and grapefruit smoothie Chicken, tomato, mushrooms and lettuce wholemeal burrito Quinoa bowl with salmon, avocado, beansprouts and mixed veggies A banana half dipped in dark chocolate
Tue Spinach and tomato omelette Vietnamese rice paper rolls with prawns and veggies Grilled fish with a serve of sweet potatoes and a serve of grilled veggies Yogurt dipped strawberries
Wed Fresh berries and peaches with low-fat yoghurt Thai beef salad Turkey meatballs over zucchini noodles Baked apples with cinnamon dusting
Thur Mushroom and bell pepper omelette Chicken, tomato, mushrooms and lettuce wholemeal burrito Quinoa bowl with salmon, avocado, beansprouts and mixed veggies A banana half dipped in dark chocolate
Fri Kale, celery, carrot and grapefruit smoothie Vietnamese rice paper rolls with prawns and veggies Baked pork chops with a serve of mashed cauliflower and a serve of grilled veggies Yogurt dipped strawberries
Sat Poached eggs and asparagus on wholemeal toast Lentil dal with hearty greens Seafood green curry with a serve of brown rice Baked apples with cinnamon dusting
Sun Fresh berries and peaches with low-fat yoghurt Asian chicken noodle soup Turkey meatballs over zucchini noodles Watermelon, feta and mint skewers