The beginner’s guide to Frisbee golf

The beginner’s guide to Frisbee golf

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The beginner’s guide to Frisbee golf

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Much like traditional golf, Frisbee golf (also known as disc golf), the goal is to sink your Frisbee in the target area with the least amount of throws. The sport has been around for almost 50 years, but in more recent times has grown in popularity.

A Frisbee is thrown (hopefully skillfully) from a tee off area to a target area, the most common is called an elevated metal basket, sometimes referred to as a pot hole. Each throw counts as one shot. Consecutive shots start from where the Frisbee lands.

Trees, lakes and undulating terrain of the course make the course more challenging. You may want to have a stack of Frisbees, if you’re not a good shot and some end up in the drink, where you’re not prepared to retrieve them.

Anyone can play Frisbee golf, from toddlers through to grandparents. If you can throw a Frisbee, you can play! If you can’t find a dedicated course in a town near you, it’s easy enough to set up your own Frisbee golf, using your backyard as the fairway. Find your nearest Frisbee (or disc golf) course. Some city parks even have free to play Frisbee golf courses. You don’t even need friends to play Frisbee golf. It’s a great work out whether you’re alone or with a group of friends. The best thing about playing alone is you don’t need to find a tee off time that suits everyone. You can also pick up the pace, running to wherever your Frisbee lands.

In addition to aerobic exercise, your upper body and arms will get a workout from all the throwing, and twisting, while your lower body is targeted from bending down to pick up your Frisbee. It will also improve your concentration and hand/eye coordination. If you are unfit, start off slow and work your way up to completing all 9 holes.

And if you want to take Frisbee golf to an all new level of playing skills, hit the course when it’s wet and windy. All you need to get started is a frisbee and comfortable walking shoes.